4 Basic Soccer Speed And Agility Cone Drills + Simple Diagrams Included

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In this post, I am going to share with you 4 soccer speed and agility cone drills for kids 3 years and older.

It is recommended that kids between 5 and 8 should be trained in speed and agility in order to build a solid foundation before they get older and concentrate on skill mastery.

Kids around 8 already have well-developed motor skills so it is best these drills can be performed properly.

Cone drills are fun and great because:

  • They are easy to perform
  • The cones are colorful
  • You can set up the cones in no time
  • They do not weigh a ton so they are easy to store and carry

Table Of Content

 


What Is Speed And Agility In Soccer?

Let me breakdown the terms speed and agility and how they are important in soccer:

Speed is the ability to take off running and slow down within seconds. This skill is important when dribbling, passing, and playing defense. 

Agility, on the other hand, is the ability a player can maneuver, kick, pass the ball in tight space. A player is able to twist and turn when dribbling the ball, and still kick the ball accurately. 

Think of Lionel Messi and Christian Ronaldo when hearing speed and agility. They can run fast with the ball, Dribble past Defenders, and score from any angle. 

Although it’s partly due to natural talent the rest is due to hours and hours of speed and agility drills. 

If you are serious about your kid’s soccer performance then you must add speed and agility in your kid’s training program because the older kids can only join a soccer club after a tryout.

As usual, you will be the head coach, but it will be beneficial for you if you join in the fun as well.

Without further ado, let us dive into the drills.

 

Soccer cones on the grass
Soccer cones on the grass

 


Tips:

  • Remember to warm-up and stretch before doing the drills
  • Start slowly, even walk, with any new drill until your kid becomes familiar with it
  • Proper technique is more important than trying to complete the drill in a hurry
  • Swing the arms naturally to provide balance
  • The timing indicates progress. The less time it takes to complete a set indicates that your kid is getting better

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4 Basic Soccer Speed And Agility Cone Drills


 

1. Follow-The-Leader Drill

Age: +3 Years Old

Follow-The-Leader is a very basic drill and as long as your kid can run then he or she can do it with your help.

The idea is that your kid will run after you as you try to avoid being tagged.

Try to be unpredictable with your moves so it that encourages your kid to run, stop, turn, and twist as they run after you.

This drill will help develop your kid’s speed, agility, coordination, and balance. Perfect for motor skills as well.

Your kid will absolutely love this drill because they are fun and they are already used to running around the house or the backyard.

Also, this drill can be performed indoors and outdoors.

Here is how you perform the Follow-The-Leader Drill:

  • Mark a 10 meter X 10-meter square space with 4 cones – you can make the square larger or smaller.
  • Inside the square will be the play area

 

Variations:

Once your kid becomes better you can add some challenges to it:

  • Use 2 soccer balls – 1 for you and 1 for your kid. Ask your kid to mimic your moves. Keep it simple and fun.
  • Increase the tempo of the drill.

 


2.  Cone Color Drill ~ Circle

Age: +3 Years Old

The cone color drill is another exciting drill for any beginner who is looking to have fun while training.

Place 4 different colored cones (e.g. red, green, yellow, and blue) in a circle – about 5 meters apart and place 1 cone in the center.

You can narrow or widen the circle depending on your kid’s age.

Here is how you perform the Cone Color Drill:

  • Start the drill with your kid in the center (brown cone) and call out one color of the 4 cones. For example, call out “Red”.
  • Your kid will run to the red cone, go around it then return to the center
  • Repeat.

Here is the sequence of how 1 set  of the drill looks like:

1 Set = Center Cone ⇒ Red Cone ⇒ Center Cone ⇒ Green Cone ⇒ Center Cone ⇒ Yellow Cone ⇒ Center Cone ⇒ Blue Cone ⇒ Center Cone.

 

Cone Color Drill Diagram
Cone Color Drill Diagram

 

This is a great drill for your kid to create awareness of his or her surroundings and act quickly.

This is because your kid has to decide which is the correct color.

This is an important skill in soccer – quick decision making can make a difference in winning or losing a soccer match or preventing an injury.

 

Variations:

  • Instead of running back, instruct your kid to backpedal to the center
  • Use a soccer ball to dribble to the cone and back to the center.
  • Call out 2 or 3 colors so your kid can run to each one.
  • Use a stopwatch to record the time it takes to complete all 4 color cones. The shorter the time the better.

 


3. T-Drill

Age: +3 Years Old

This drill is called T-Drill because the cone layout was shaped like the letter T.

As in the diagram below, you will place 4 cones 5 meters apart like the shape of the letter T.

The starting point is cone A and the center is cone B.

One the left and right side of cone B is cone C (Yellow) and cone D (Green). Any color will do as long as they are not the same.

Here is how the drill is performed:

  • Position your kid at cone A
  • You call out Yellow cone (cone C)
  • Your kid runs to cone B and then run to Yellow cone, returns to cone B and back to cone A
  • You call out Green cone (Cone D)
  • Your kid runs to cone B and then run to Green cone, returns to cone B and back to cone A
  • Repeat

Here is the sequence of how 1 set  of the drill looks like:

1 Set = A ⇒ B ⇒ C ⇒ B ⇒ A ⇒ B ⇒ D ⇒ B ⇒ A

T-Drill Diagram
T-Drill Diagram

 

Variations:

  • Side shuffle (run sideways) to the cone C and D and back to B instead of running.
  • Run normally or side shuffle from cone B to C to D then B before returning to cone A
  • Instead of running back from cone B to A, try backpedaling instead
  • Incorporate soccer ball dribbling into the drill
  • Record the time it takes to complete one set. The shorter the time the better.

 


4. Zig Zag Drill

Age: +3 Years Old

The Zig Zag Drill is also known as Cone Weaving which is another super easy drill for your kid to perform.

Line up 7 cones (more or fewer cones is okay) as shown in the diagram below.

Here is the sequence of how 1 set  of the drill looks like:

1 Set = Run around each cone, then run back to the starting point

 

Zig Zag Drill Diagram
Zig Zag Drill Diagram

 

Variation:

  • Perform drill while dribbling the ball
  • After zig-zagging the cones, backpedal to the starting point – instead of running back.
  • You can switch the layout of the cones so that your kid can start with the left or right cone.
  • Keep a record of the time it takes to complete 1 set. The lesser the time the better.

 


Equipment needed

Other gear to consider

Although it is optional, it is best that your kid should wear the actual or similar soccer gear when doing the drills.

I believe that your kid will get a better feel of how these gear can affect the drills as if playing in a real soccer game.

I would recommend (if possible) for your kid to wear the following:

 


Conclusion

The speed and agility cone drills are great ways to develop your kid’s performance on field.

If you follow the video and diagrams I included in this post it will be easier for you to understand.

Also, if you don’t have any real cones yet, don’t worry. You can bottles filled with water or sand instead.

Be safe and have fun.

 

Related: Renegade Soccer Training Review – Play With Confidence
If you have any questions please let me know in the comment section below.

 

Sources:

Video:

Kidz Sports Hub

Images

Image by andres_barajasg from Pixabay

Photo by Ruslan Alekso from Pexels

Research:

LiveStrong

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